Delivery Driver

Delivery Drivers (sometimes known as couriers) use vans, cars, motorbikes, bicycles and trucks to deliver goods. They need to determine appropriate routes and ensure that goods are correctly stowed. They may work for themselves, or provide their own vehicles on a sub-contract basis. Good customer service and communication skills are important. Some drivers are required to wear a uniform.

Other responsibilities include:

  • Loading and unloading
  • Checking paperwork, or using a hand-held device to track goods
  • Receiving payments
  • Providing customer service and advice
  • Reporting maintenance issues with the vehicle

Irregular hours or shift work can be required. With the growth in online shopping and the increase in the freight task more generally, employment opportunities for Delivery Drivers are expected to grow strongly over the coming years. There are career pathways into other driving roles, such as Truck Driver, which may require additional licences.

Industry facts

  • The Road Transport sector embraces new technologies and constantly seeks to improve safety, productivity and professionalism.
  • Over the five years through 2012/13, total tonnage hauled by road freight is expected to increase to 207 billion tonne-kilometres.
  • There are various specialisations of Delivery Driver, from Grocery Deliverer and Fast Food Deliverer to jobs working for furniture and goods companies delivering purchases to customers. This offers many diverse opportunities for Delivery Drivers working in the Industry.

Entry Qualifications

Licence:

  • Relevant driving licence requirements exist for type of vehicle and product being transported.

Training qualification:

  • Certificate II in Driving Operations

Estimated Salary

$29,000 – $47,000 (Median $36,000) depending on type of licence and organisation*.
*Wages will vary according to your level of skill, experience, employer and geographical location.

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PDF document Delivery Driver (or Courier Driver) Career Overview