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Aviation Training Package Update

Aviation Training Package Update

Aviation Training Package Update

In this month’s edition of the Aviation Training Package newsletter, you will read about aviation security in Australia, and learn about your rights and obligations under Australia’s transport security legislation. The Department of Infrastructure and Regional Development administers the Aviation Transport Security Act 2004 (the Act) and the Aviation Transport Security Regulations 2005 (the Regulations).

The Act and Regulations came into force in Australia on 10 March 2005. The purpose of the legislation is to establish a regulatory framework to safeguard against unlawful interference to aviation. It also establishes minimum security requirements for civil aviation in Australia by imposing obligations on persons engaged with civil aviation related activities. In particular it obliges certain aviation industry participants to develop, and comply with, aviation security programmes.

The Aviation Transport Security Act 2004 establishes a number of mechanisms to safeguard against unlawful interference with aviation, and also gives effect to Australia’s aviation security obligations under the Convention on International Aviation (also known as the Chicago Convention). Under these laws people and companies that operate within the aviation industry have responsibilities that help to maintain Australia’s excellent reputation as one of the most secure places in the world.

The meaning of unlawful interference with aviation is defined as any of the following done, or attempted to be done, without lawful authority is an unlawful interference with aviation;

  • taking control of an aircraft by force, or threat of force, or any other form of intimidation or by any trick or false pretence
  • destroying an aircraft that is in service
  • causing damage to an aircraft that is in service that puts the safety of the aircraft, or any person on board or outside the aircraft, at risk
  • doing anything on board an aircraft that is in service that puts the safety of the aircraft, or any person on board or outside the aircraft, at risk
  • placing, or causing to be placed, on board an aircraft that is in service anything that puts the safety of the aircraft, or any person on board or outside the aircraft, at risk
  • putting the safety of aircraft at risk by interfering with, damaging or destroying air navigation facilities
  • putting the safety of an aircraft at risk by communicating false or misleading information
  • committing an act at an airport, or causing any interference or damage, that puts the safe operation of the airport, or the safety of any person at the airport, at risk.

However, unlawful interference with aviation does not include lawful advocacy, protest, dissent or industrial action that does not result in, or contribute to, an action of a kind mentioned above.

Aviation security incidents are classified as either a threat of unlawful interference with aviation, or an unlawful interference with aviation. To ensure that aviation security is maintained across all areas of operations, the legislation prescribes requirements for reporting these types of incidents. Each of the following is a person with incident reporting responsibilities:

  • an aviation security inspector
  • an airport security guard
  • a screening officer
  • an aviation industry participant other than a participant who is an airport operator, an aircraft operator, or an employee of another aviation industry participant.

The AVI Aviation Training Package includes a wide range of units of competency and skill sets that address legislative and industry requirements. All AVI units that have the O competency field are classified as ‘Security’, and are used across the package where aviation security is a focus of the job. In addition, various other AVI units of competency have been redrafted through transition and Aviation Project activities to include skills and knowledge related to aviation security management, reporting of unlawful interference incidents, and individual task and role responsibilities.

If you wish to provide training package feedback or to find out more about TLISC’s Aviation Training Package activity, please contact Dan Minton, Senior Training Package Specialist-Aviation on 0459 021 115 or Dan.Minton@tlisc.org.au.


PUBLISHED IN Aviation > Latest News ON September 15, 2015

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