Jan Becker – Women Moving Australia

Women Moving Australia Case Studies Name: Jan Becker What is your job title? CEO and Director, Becker Helicopter Services Pty Ltd Which company/organisation do you work for? Becker Helicopters Pilot Academy and Associated Companies. I am also a Midwife who works at Sunshine Coast Private Hospital and a Volunteer Midwife in Tanzania. Board member for: Helicopter Association International USA Prince Charles Hospital | QLD Health Cherish Gynaecological Cancer Foundation (Deputy Chair) Job description (in 25 words or less!): My role is to drive the strategic goals of the company, oversee the regulatory and compliance issues, and manage our systems and finances to ensure the company’s fleet of 18 helicopters can stay in the air. What studies have you undertaken? I hold a Masters in Aviation Management, a Bachelor of Science (Nursing), Registered Midwife and I hold a Commercial Helicopter Pilots Licence. I have also attended Harvard, in Boston USA for residency school on Leadership and Innovation. I am currently completing a Ph. D. Tell us about your experience in the transport & logistics industry. I grew up in Singapore. My father was involved in the aerial transport of Air fast in Asia. He is a 17,000 fixed wing agriculture pilot himself. My brother is a licenced aeronautical engineer and pilot. My husband, Mike Becker, is a 15,000 hour helicopter pilot. I was destined to have a role in air transport. In the early 1990’s I worked as a Midwife in the remote areas of PNG often getting in and out of remote areas by helicopter. We came back to Australia and established Becker Helicopters in 1995. In 2000 when I...

Rachel Bacon – Women Moving Australia

Women Moving Australia Case Studies Name: Rachel Bacon What is your job title? B2 CASA Licenced Aircraft Maintenance Engineer Which company/organisation do you work for? Qantas Job description (in 25 words or less!): Maintain, inspect, repair, test and troubleshoot electrical, instrument and radio systems and their components. What studies have you undertaken? I completed an apprenticeship and Certificate IV in Aeroskills (Avionics) and for my B2 a Diploma in Aeroskills (Avionics). I am currently studying a Bachelor of Engineering (Honours) in Electrical Engineering and a Certificate IV in Training and Assessment. Tell us about your experience in the transport & logistics industry. It is extremely rewarding to know that the work that we do ensures thousands of people each and every day make it to their destinations or home to their loved ones safely. Which other industries have you worked in? Whilst studying I worked in retail and I soon realised I was not a ‘people person’, I also worked in hospitality (because who doesn’t love food?) but was told I was “eating all the profits”. I am really grateful for the experience and it makes me appreciate how much I love working in aviation. What is the best career advice you have received? Work hard and be so good you that become indispensable. Best advice to give: Be better than the person you were yesterday. It’s a bad day when: You don’t get a chance to have breakfast (or a cup of coffee) until after midday. It’s a good day when: You see the aircraft you’ve been working on taxi, take off and fly away. What direction do you...

Sharp Airlines – Trainee Profile

Dushyant Mehrotra, 22, was born to fly. He sought out Sharp Airlines’ 18-month, nationally accredited training after two and a half years of an aviation degree. Mehrotra is completing a Certificate IV in Aviation (Commercial Pilot Aeroplane Licence) and Diploma of Aviation (Instrument Flying Operations) and, like all successful trainees, will be appointed as a First Officer with Sharp on graduation. The Transport and Logistics Industry Skills Council (TLISC) developed his qualifications, which allow him to fly for any Australian carrier in the future, and brokered his training under the National Workforce Development Fund (NWDF). Mehrotra’s parents raised him in Dubai where his father was general manager of a travel company, so knew many pilots. “We used to travel a lot. I loved sitting in the cockpit, chatting with the pilots,” he says. Mehrotra is one of an annual intake of just 14 students, and admits the school’s intentionally small size initially concerned him, having come from a class of 200. But a mentor pointed out it would help his career take off with more air hours and hands-on experience, essential in the aviation industry. “The pilot shortage, it’s not looking for inexperienced pilots, which is what I would’ve been,” he says. Aviation is “dynamic: no two days are the same. Actually, no two hours are the same. I plan for a flight and two hours later the winds change, 180 degrees. That is when training comes into effect: you need to be able to think and react fast.” Mehrotra says trainee pilots should have a good grasp of maths, physics and English along with confidence, motivation, discipline and...

Sharp Airlines

Established in 1990, Sharp Airlines is a regional airline with operations stretching across Victoria, South Australia and Tasmania. With its headquarters in Hamilton, Victoria, the locally-owned business carries approximately 100,000 passengers a year between eight locations. A high ambition in the aviation sector is to attract, train and retain quality pilots to fly in regional areas, says Sharp Airlines’ training manager Helen Sobey.. Locally owned Around 70 staff and a fleet of 15 aircraft transport passengers, freight, post and essential services between major cities and surrounding regional areas. A high ambition in the aviation sector is to attract, train and retain quality pilots to fly in regional areas, says Sharp Airlines’ training manager Helen Sobey. “The nature of the industry is that, as their experience and flying hours increase, they will be offered work with the national and international carriers,” she says. But with help from the Transport and Logistics Industry Skills Council (TLISC), Sharp is putting the pilot shortage and their regional location to best advantage by delivering training under the National Workforce Development Fund (NWDF). Managing director/chief pilot Malcolm Sharp and director/chief instructor Peter Sobey founded Sharp Airlines in their Victorian hometown of Hamilton in 1990. Two men and a plane have grown to 70 staff and fleet of 15 craft flying freight, post and passengers to three southern states, and to Flinders Island exclusively. Experience counts Sharp’s airline pilot cadet course is the longestrunning of its kind in Australia and guarantees graduates a 9-month cadetship on completion of their studies. The growing business created the opportunity for a flying school, as Sharp must employ 12-14 junior...

Australian Airports Association

The Australian Airports Association (AAA) is the national voice for Australian Airports and represents the interests of over 250 airports and aerodromes across Australia, from regional landing strips to major international gateway airports. From outback towns with grass aerodromes to metropolitan aviation hubs servicing millions of passengers a year, the Australian Airports Association has had a f lying start in giving a national standard of training to its 250 members. Industry advocate The Australian Airports Association (AAA) is a non-profit organisation, founded in 1982 and is the leading advocate for appropriate national policy relating to airport activities. The AAA began in 1982 to represent the interests of airports and aerodromes Australia-wide. It moved to Canberra in 2010 and, with support from industry, underwent major change with the appointment of staff and increased resources. AAA’s membership is “vast and diverse”, says its chief executive Caroline Wilkie. “There are distinct differences in needs between the different sized airports, but the NWDF training was a fantastic overview on all the rules that are required.” The AAA coordinated training for a Certificate III in Aviation (Ground Operations and Service) under the National Workforce Development Fund (NWDF), which the Transport and Logistics Industry Skills Council (TLISC) administers. CASA, the Civil Aviation Safety Authority, doesn’t mandate how training must be delivered, but the appointment of “appropriately trained” Aerodrome Reporting and Works Safety Officers (AROs and WSOs) is a legislated requirement, Wilkie says. AROs ensure an airport is serviceable for aircraft; WSOs ensure it is safe. When the Commonwealth Government had a comprehensive training program for airport staff when it used to operated regional airports, Wilkie says....