Rebecca Warren – Women Moving Australia

Women Moving Australia Case Studies Name: Rebecca Warren What is your job title? Specialist HR Projects and Improvements Which company/organisation do you work for? Roy Hill Job description (in 25 words or less!): My role is newly created and is focussed on developing and implementing new initiatives or improvements relating to people. What studies have you undertaken? My undergraduate degree was a Bachelor of Business (major in IR & HR) – most of which I completed part-time as I was working full-time; I then completed a Graduate Diploma in Law and later a Masters in OHS. I am also a 2014 Alumni of the Signature Leadership Program; a 10 month experiential leadership development program which is run by Leadership WA. The Signature Leadership Program was a unique experience from which I learned about current issues facing WA; reflected on my own leadership journey and style and gained new perspectives from my peers (who were an equal mix of professionals from Government, not-for-profit and the corporate sectors). Tell us about your experience in the transport & logistics industry. I started in the industry with Brambles Industrial Services as a Management Trainee in Newcastle, NSW. The traineeship was a unique opportunity where we were given the opportunity to drive trucks, forklifts, cranes and other mobile equipment; whilst studying at university. In my first 3 years I obtained a range of tickets and licences, including dogman; forklift; loader; skid steer; crane operator and HR then HC truck licences; and I then got experience in other operational and support roles. When I graduated I was offered a role in the Brambles Australasia head office in North Sydney as...

Belinda Polglase – Women Moving Australia

Women Moving Australia Case Studies Name: Belinda Polglase What is your job title? Project Manager Which company/organisation do you work for? All Purpose Transport (APT) Job description (in 25 words or less!): Coordinating TAFE level qualifications for all our staff and owner drivers, managing the Sales Team, managing functions and events, and various other projects. What studies have you undertaken? Bachelor of Business – HR (Griffith University), Bachelor of Arts – Japanese (Griffith University), Advanced Diploma of Management (MSIT – TAFE Qld), Crestcom Bulletproof Manager Tell us about your experience in the transport & logistics industry. My parents started All Purpose Transport in our family home 40 years ago when I was just 2 years old so I have grown up surrounded by all things transport and was a regular feature helping with clerical duties in the office growing up. Once I was old enough to drive I would often be found making deliveries, during our busiest times of year, and when I was on University holidays. I have been at APT fulltime now for 18 years and have gained vast experience by working in various roles and parts of the business from Customer Service, Fleet Management and Warehousing before working my way up to my first Divisional Management role of our Parcel Delivery Business. From there I transitioned over to Head Office as Administration / Finance Manager before I moved into my current role of Project Manager. Which other industries have you worked in? Travel Industry – Travel Consultant  at Flight Centre, Hospitality Industry, Executive Recruitment What is the best career advice you have received? Communicate well and listen...

NSW Taxi Council – WELL case study

Communication is a two-way street, but it can be a bumpy ride when language is littered with turns of phrase and slang in an accent very foreign to your own. For many of New South Wales’ 24,000 taxi drivers, the rules around language, literacy and numeracy are as intricate as a map of any big city. So the NSW Taxi Council is providing guidance through a training consortium model, in partnership with training provider Hunter TAFE, under the Workplace English Language and Literacy (WELL) Program. The program is funded by the Commonwealth Department of Industry, and was brokered by the Transport and Logistics Industry Skills Council (TLISC),  to provide training in comprehension and communication skills. Ultimately, the outcome of the program is to improve the customer’s experience by offering a very high level of customer service. The training allows participants to achieve several Units of Competency which target reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. The program and complements other studies and ensures workers can meet current and future job needs. NSW Taxi Council training and development manager Christina Klaasse says the training’s consortium model works “because we don’t fall into the traditional employee/employer relationship that exists in other WELL programs. “We’re managing an education process where we’re not dealing with employees, but rather industry participants, as taxi drivers and taxi operators are self-employed.” Klaasse says the industry has always had drivers from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds, “probably a higher proportion than most other industries, so language, literacy and numeracy have been important to us for a long time”. The training allows participants to achieve several Units of Competency...

Metro Tasmania – WELL case study

A bus driver’s priority is to be competent and safe, but it is also vital they count money, run on time and re-route when safety signs advise changed conditions. And that’s just on the road: at the depot, there might be maintenance reports to file or a vehicle manual to memorise, so literacy and numeracy skills are key. Bus company Metro Tasmania has handed its 450-strong workforce just such a key through the Workplace English Language and Literacy (WELL) Program. The program offers funding, brokered by the Transport and Logistics Industry Skills Council (TLISC), for training in comprehension and communication skills. The training complements studies towards Certificate IIIs and IVs in Driving Operations as well as ensuring workers can, more broadly, meet current and future job needs. Metro’s human resources manager, Craig Anderson, says drivers know they need qualifications for career progression, but some had felt held back by poor language, literacy and numeracy skills. “We do testing so we know people can read and write before they start with us, so WELL has been aimed at the longer-term, older drivers,” Anderson says. WELL has been a driving force in developing skills to enable those established drivers “to successfully complete nationally accredited training”, he says. Anderson has also noticed WELL-educated drivers are making better use of Metro’s Transport Information Management System, a database that, either via keyboard or audio input, logs operational and mechanical issues for resolution. So WELL has supported vocational training, but also e-learning with OH&S. Drivers with poor literacy and numeracy had avoided using the system, which meant Metro was missing out on significant information, such as breakdowns....

All Purpose Transport – Trainee Profile

Steven Kilby’s entire career has been on the road – albeit driving a desk lately. A fleet manager for All Purpose Transport (APT) in Brisbane, Kilby, 52, has benefitted from APT’s investment in training and development, completing both a Diploma of Logistics and a Certificate IV in Business Administration. Kilby’s training was delivered under the National Workforce Development Fund (NWDF), which was brokered by the Transport and Logistics Industry Skills Council (TLISC). “When I started the Diploma, I didn’t realise how much I actually did know,” Kilby says. “Then I went, hang on, I know that … It was a bit of an awakening.” Kilby started out as a travelling sales rep, but gave it away for taxi driving, in turn becoming a taxi dispatcher before a “natural progression” to fleet management. He first began with APT in the year 2000, but returned in 2006 after pursuing similar roles in other transport companies. “I had always liked APT,” Kilby says It can’t hurt my prospects, having a nationally accredited diploma. This is because APT, a family owned company, values its people as much as its product, and shows genuine interest in staff by investing in their development. “Not only will you get your staff working well for you, you’re also going to add value to your product and company,” Kilby says. “It is an investment, not just to make you look good, but that’s going to keep on giving if you keep on training.” As a fleet manager, he is responsible for a team of drivers and their compliance. “Workplace health and safety has become a big thing in...