Toll Global Logistics – Trainee Profile

Stephen Rea took a casual job in warehousing thinking he would one day be a rock star, but soon came to find he was more in tune with transport and logistics. Rea, 58, is a team leader at Toll’s Customised Solutions, the specialised warehousing service of Toll Global Logistics. His role includes coordinating the handling of garments to retailers in a cross-dock and pick-and-pack system. Based at Altona North in Melbourne’s west, Rea has eagerly participated in Customised Solutions upskilling of its workforce, including attaining a Certificate III in Warehousing. The Certificate III is a national qualification developed by the Transport and Logistics Industry Skills Council (TLISC), who also brokered the National Workforce Development Fund (NWDF) that afforded Rea’s development. “Initially I thought this training would be another management fad,” Rea says. “It’s proved not to be the case. Toll is the most supportive employer I have ever worked for. I am really impressed with the commitment they have to training.” “Customised Solutions is most interested to train its workforce towards continuous improvement, which is a method basically to make procedures and processes efficient. That’s been an enormous help to me and fits in with what we try to do here,” Rea says. Training has been crucial to being able to answer those challenges. “We try to be versatile in what we do, to respond more quickly to variations in the workload. Training has been crucial to being able to answer those challenges.” “My skill set has been enhanced immensely and I am two or three times more confident now … to get the job done. It has been...

John Holland Rail – Trainee Profile

When Jason Olejnik thought up an all-weather computer tablet to log welding records on major upgrades, his employer John Holland Rail embraced the idea. Olejnik, 33, a track supervisor, says the training offered by the company and increased responsibilities gave him confidence to put forward his idea, a new process that will ensure more accurate and timely recordings of safety-crucial welding jobs. A concreter since he left school, Olejnik moved to welding about eight years ago, and has been an employee of John Holland Rail for more than four years. He now holds a Certificate IV in Frontline Management. “Often we are working at night and in the rain and paper records get messy or lost, and the weld returns are often not done correctly,” Olejnik says. “I’d been around welding a long time, for many years, and knew there were a lot of issues. “So at John Holland I came up with the idea of using a tablet, but knew it had to be durable in all weather like ones used by military: basically, something that would still work if you dropped it. “Once we have this we’ll be able to email returns straight to the client from site.” Once the rail is cut, we just don’t stop, rain, hail or shine. His job is logistically challenging and costly, repairing and installing rail works on busy city rail links with delays potentially costing up to $100,000 a minute. Each fix requires weeks of planning, with strict time limits on when tasks can be done, usually at off-peak times such as weekends involving around-the-clock work from 2am on Saturdays...

Navigators – Trainee Profile

You’ve got to be cool, calm and collected to be a good skipper says Tom Goodwin. Goodwin, 25, already has 10 years in maritime, having started as a “deckie” with his employer, Navigators, at age 15 and worked his way up to a Master 5 ticket to captain a 25m vessel by age 20. He now has a Certificate IV in Transport and Distribution (Coastal Maritime Operations), a national qualification developed by the Transport and Logistics Industry Skills Council (TLISC) and is driving a $6 million boat as a certified Master 4. Training to become a Master 4 “prepares you to be safe”, Goodwin says. His training covered navigation and collision regulations, helm technologies, vessel stability, sailing simulations, and “every aspect of the maritime industry”. Six days a week the 34m Navigators ferry cruises to Hobart’s Museum of Old and New Art (MONA), a cool jewel in Tasmania’s tourism crown, via the Derwent. The ferry is unlike many, if any, others: an extension of MONA’s “experience”, it is kitted out to match the museum’s world-class standards, complete with chef and barista bars, VIP lounge, vibrant art, and a chirpy Brazilian Jenday parrot called Trevor. Having a job like this on your doorstep is one in a million. But Goodwin must sit above the hubbub in the wheelhouse where, as master and engineer, he has dual responsibilities for the vessel’s daily operations, safety and crew as well as monitoring the unmanned engine rooms and numerous gauges. Then there is the considerable task of manoeuvring the vessel up to 25 knots on the narrow river, watching out for other craft, from...

Sharp Airlines – Trainee Profile

Dushyant Mehrotra, 22, was born to fly. He sought out Sharp Airlines’ 18-month, nationally accredited training after two and a half years of an aviation degree. Mehrotra is completing a Certificate IV in Aviation (Commercial Pilot Aeroplane Licence) and Diploma of Aviation (Instrument Flying Operations) and, like all successful trainees, will be appointed as a First Officer with Sharp on graduation. The Transport and Logistics Industry Skills Council (TLISC) developed his qualifications, which allow him to fly for any Australian carrier in the future, and brokered his training under the National Workforce Development Fund (NWDF). Mehrotra’s parents raised him in Dubai where his father was general manager of a travel company, so knew many pilots. “We used to travel a lot. I loved sitting in the cockpit, chatting with the pilots,” he says. Mehrotra is one of an annual intake of just 14 students, and admits the school’s intentionally small size initially concerned him, having come from a class of 200. But a mentor pointed out it would help his career take off with more air hours and hands-on experience, essential in the aviation industry. “The pilot shortage, it’s not looking for inexperienced pilots, which is what I would’ve been,” he says. Aviation is “dynamic: no two days are the same. Actually, no two hours are the same. I plan for a flight and two hours later the winds change, 180 degrees. That is when training comes into effect: you need to be able to think and react fast.” Mehrotra says trainee pilots should have a good grasp of maths, physics and English along with confidence, motivation, discipline and...

All Purpose Transport – Trainee Profile

Steven Kilby’s entire career has been on the road – albeit driving a desk lately. A fleet manager for All Purpose Transport (APT) in Brisbane, Kilby, 52, has benefitted from APT’s investment in training and development, completing both a Diploma of Logistics and a Certificate IV in Business Administration. Kilby’s training was delivered under the National Workforce Development Fund (NWDF), which was brokered by the Transport and Logistics Industry Skills Council (TLISC). “When I started the Diploma, I didn’t realise how much I actually did know,” Kilby says. “Then I went, hang on, I know that … It was a bit of an awakening.” Kilby started out as a travelling sales rep, but gave it away for taxi driving, in turn becoming a taxi dispatcher before a “natural progression” to fleet management. He first began with APT in the year 2000, but returned in 2006 after pursuing similar roles in other transport companies. “I had always liked APT,” Kilby says It can’t hurt my prospects, having a nationally accredited diploma. This is because APT, a family owned company, values its people as much as its product, and shows genuine interest in staff by investing in their development. “Not only will you get your staff working well for you, you’re also going to add value to your product and company,” Kilby says. “It is an investment, not just to make you look good, but that’s going to keep on giving if you keep on training.” As a fleet manager, he is responsible for a team of drivers and their compliance. “Workplace health and safety has become a big thing in...